Food

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Re: Food

Postby wildlx » 06 May 2014, 08:15

:hmm: So there is a gingerbread story. I'll have to check that.
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Re: Food

Postby Proofrdr » 07 May 2014, 06:22

It's a story of pride, braggadocio, and ultimate devastation. In other words, a children's story.
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Re: Food

Postby Sacchi » 07 May 2014, 08:48

Lesson from the story: if you're cocky because you've outrun the human who baked you, don't trust the fox to let you ride on his back over the river.
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Re: Food

Postby wildlx » 08 May 2014, 05:04

Thanks for the insights on the story :-).
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Re: Food

Postby Nurse Jo » 10 May 2014, 09:01

I had a wonderful Ladybird version of the story. The classic ladybird version - here's the cover.
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Re: Food

Postby Baker » 10 May 2014, 15:58

I probably had the same one, Jo. Wow, I hadn't heard of Ladybird books in an aeon.
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Re: Food

Postby wildlx » 11 May 2014, 01:00

Ah. It seems that a lot of the cultural differences start with children books :).
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Re: Food

Postby Baker » 11 May 2014, 10:32

Makes sense.
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Re: Food

Postby Nurse Jo » 11 May 2014, 10:41

The ladybird books had lovely clear pictures and the fiction ones often would be in rhyme which was great to read and listen to. hypnotic in fact, I find them calming even now - I still like to read them to my nieces and nephews!! They also did a great series of factual books. The books on different periods in history, and different countries and how people lived, just grabbed me as a 4-6 year old and lit a life long passion in me for those subjects. They did not patronise you. Interestingly, most of the fairy stories and folk tales seem to have their origin in folk tales from Germany/Scandinavia/Russia.This discussion board I found talks about the similarities between the Runaway Pancake/The Giant Turnip/ The Gingerbread Man. All three were Ladybird Books I read as a child.

I don't think there are the same cultural differences now. Which is sad. It's all rather boring when most kids read the same things, mostly dictated by clever marketing. Our nephew (Sue's brother's son) loves superheroes, but has not really read or watched any books/comics/films - it's all based on peer pressure plus clever marketing and he is only at pre-school. He's 3 1/2 years old. He's also allowed to use the computer to entertain himself far too much in my opinion but there we are. My side of the family are too restricted so there must be a middle place somewhere. I'm not sure I'd want to be a parent now.

Wildlx, you read the Famous Five and progressed to Dickens etc. That was definitely cross cultural! I agree though, cultural differences did start with children' s books and just got re-enforced as you got older. However, that made me curious about other cultures, what books do other children read, what do they play? I liked differences. It seems we all have to be the same now.
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Re: Food

Postby Proofrdr » 02 Feb 2015, 06:22

Nurse Jo, I share your concern about youngsters using the computer for entertainment too much. However, it depends on what kind of entertainment they are allowed. Our great nephews, ages 6 and 7, each received a tablet for Christmas. At first, I was very skeptical, but to their parents' credit, how they use them is very controlled. The only apps on them are for learning—number games, word games, spelling games, and age-appropriate reading. The boys are not allowed to use them until after they've finished their homework. I still can't get over that there is homework for kindergarteners!

Anyway, I see the computer as a tool that has to be monitored and used properly with children. I think denying them the ability to develop a familiarity with the technology is as harmful as not closely monitoring their use of it. There has to be a balance.
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