Not funny, not weird, not stupid -- but interesting.

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Re: Not funny, not weird, not stupid -- but interesting.

Postby wildlx » 29 Nov 2015, 08:39

Great piece about Patricia Highsmith on The New Yorker http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2015/ ... idden-love
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Re: Not funny, not weird, not stupid -- but interesting.

Postby Proofrdr » 29 Nov 2015, 13:24

Yes! Excellent article. Thanks for pointing it out, W. :-)
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Re: Not funny, not weird, not stupid -- but interesting.

Postby wildlx » 04 Dec 2015, 09:30

This has spread now to UK universities and I wonder when it will reach other countries. For me it's mind boggling

The Coddling of the American Mind
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Re: Not funny, not weird, not stupid -- but interesting.

Postby Proofrdr » 04 Dec 2015, 12:23

My university always had an open forum for speakers of all types and on all sides of an argument. The protocol was to listen, to question, and, if in opposition, to argue with fervor, but with decorum. And that's the way it was until about 10 years ago when an invited speaker was shouted off the stage. A group of students who opposed his views didn't allow him to speak at all.

The President's office and the alumni office were overwhelmed with messages of disbelief and real concern. I don't know if it's because alumni money talks or if the President and Deans were just as appalled, but they worked with the student groups and made it clear that the university's responsibility is to present differing points of view to expand the students' knowledge and awareness and that stifling free speech is not the way to learn. If they did not agree, they did not need to stay.

I hope they are still on that track because limiting what you hear to what makes you feel good is simply not being educated.
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Re: Not funny, not weird, not stupid -- but interesting.

Postby wildlx » 08 Dec 2015, 22:24

Good of your uni! But apparently that is not what is going on in most of them.
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Re: Not funny, not weird, not stupid -- but interesting.

Postby wildlx » 08 Dec 2015, 22:32

Interesting the fact that the top 3 are all by women.

The 100 best British novels

What does the rest of the world see as the greatest British novels? In search of a collective critical assessment, BBC Culture contributor Jane Ciabattari polled 82 book critics, from Australia to Zimbabwe – but none from the UK. This list includes no nonfiction, no plays, no narrative or epic poems (no Paradise Lost or Beowulf), no short story collections (no Morte D’Arthur) – novels only, by British authors (which means no James Joyce).

100. The Code of the Woosters (PG Wodehouse, 1938)
99. There but for the (Ali Smith, 2011)
98. Under the Volcano (Malcolm Lowry,1947)
97. The Chronicles of Narnia (CS Lewis, 1949-1954)
96. Memoirs of a Survivor (Doris Lessing, 1974)
95. The Buddha of Suburbia (Hanif Kureishi, 1990)
94. The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner (James Hogg, 1824)
93. Lord of the Flies (William Golding, 1954)
92. Cold Comfort Farm (Stella Gibbons, 1932)
91. The Forsyte Saga (John Galsworthy, 1922)
90. The Woman in White (Wilkie Collins, 1859)
89. The Horse’s Mouth (Joyce Cary, 1944)
88. The Death of the Heart (Elizabeth Bowen, 1938)
87. The Old Wives’ Tale (Arnold Bennett,1908)
86. A Legacy (Sybille Bedford, 1956)
85. Regeneration Trilogy (Pat Barker, 1991-1995)
84. Scoop (Evelyn Waugh, 1938)
83. Barchester Towers (Anthony Trollope, 1857)
82. The Patrick Melrose Novels (Edward St Aubyn, 1992-2012)
81. The Jewel in the Crown (Paul Scott, 1966)
80. Excellent Women (Barbara Pym, 1952)
79. His Dark Materials (Philip Pullman, 1995-2000)
78. A House for Mr Biswas (VS Naipaul, 1961)
77. Of Human Bondage (W Somerset Maugham, 1915)
76. Small Island (Andrea Levy, 2004)
75. Women in Love (DH Lawrence, 1920)
74. The Mayor of Casterbridge (Thomas Hardy, 1886)
73. The Blue Flower (Penelope Fitzgerald, 1995)
72. The Heart of the Matter (Graham Greene, 1948)
71. Old Filth (Jane Gardam, 2004)
70. Daniel Deronda (George Eliot, 1876)
69. Nostromo (Joseph Conrad, 1904)
68. A Clockwork Orange (Anthony Burgess, 1962)
67. Crash (JG Ballard 1973)
66. Sense and Sensibility (Jane Austen, 1811)
65. Orlando (Virginia Woolf, 1928)
64. The Way We Live Now (Anthony Trollope, 1875)
63. The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie (Muriel Spark, 1961)
62. Animal Farm (George Orwell, 1945)
61. The Sea, The Sea (Iris Murdoch, 1978)
60. Sons and Lovers (DH Lawrence, 1913)
59. The Line of Beauty (Alan Hollinghurst, 2004)
58. Loving (Henry Green, 1945)
57. Parade’s End (Ford Madox Ford, 1924-1928)
56. Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit (Jeanette Winterson, 1985)
55. Gulliver’s Travels (Jonathan Swift, 1726)
54. NW (Zadie Smith, 2012)
53. Wide Sargasso Sea (Jean Rhys, 1966)
52. New Grub Street (George Gissing, 1891)
51. Tess of the d’Urbervilles (Thomas Hardy, 1891)
50. A Passage to India (EM Forster, 1924)
49. Possession (AS Byatt, 1990)
48. Lucky Jim (Kingsley Amis, 1954)
47. The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman (Laurence Sterne, 1759)
46. Midnight’s Children (Salman Rushdie, 1981)
45. The Little Stranger (Sarah Waters, 2009)
44. Wolf Hall (Hilary Mantel, 2009)
43. The Swimming Pool Library (Alan Hollinghurst, 1988)
42. Brighton Rock (Graham Greene, 1938)
41. Dombey and Son (Charles Dickens, 1848)
40. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland (Lewis Carroll, 1865)
39. The Sense of an Ending (Julian Barnes, 2011)
38. The Passion (Jeanette Winterson, 1987)
37. Decline and Fall (Evelyn Waugh, 1928)
36. A Dance to the Music of Time (Anthony Powell, 1951-1975)
35. Remainder (Tom McCarthy, 2005)
34. Never Let Me Go (Kazuo Ishiguro, 2005)
33. The Wind in the Willows (Kenneth Grahame, 1908)
32. A Room with a View (EM Forster, 1908)
31. The End of the Affair (Graham Greene, 1951)
30. Moll Flanders (Daniel Defoe, 1722)
29. Brick Lane (Monica Ali, 2003)
28. Villette (Charlotte Brontë, 1853)
27. Robinson Crusoe (Daniel Defoe, 1719)
26. The Lord of the Rings (JRR Tolkien, 1954)
25. White Teeth (Zadie Smith, 2000)
24. The Golden Notebook (Doris Lessing, 1962)
23. Jude the Obscure (Thomas Hardy, 1895)
22. The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling (Henry Fielding, 1749)
21. Heart of Darkness (Joseph Conrad, 1899)
20. Persuasion (Jane Austen, 1817)
19. Emma (Jane Austen, 1815)
18. Remains of the Day (Kazuo Ishiguro, 1989)
17. Howards End (EM Forster, 1910)
16. The Waves (Virginia Woolf, 1931)
15. Atonement (Ian McEwan, 2001)
14. Clarissa (Samuel Richardson,1748)
13. The Good Soldier (Ford Madox Ford, 1915)
12. Nineteen Eighty-Four (George Orwell, 1949)
11. Pride and Prejudice (Jane Austen, 1813)
10. Vanity Fair (William Makepeace Thackeray, 1848)
9. Frankenstein (Mary Shelley, 1818)
8. David Copperfield (Charles Dickens, 1850)
7. Wuthering Heights (Emily Brontë, 1847)
6. Bleak House (Charles Dickens, 1853)
5. Jane Eyre (Charlotte Brontë, 1847)
4. Great Expectations (Charles Dickens, 1861)
3. Mrs. Dalloway (Virginia Woolf, 1925)
2. To the Lighthouse (Virginia Woolf, 1927)
1. Middlemarch (George Eliot, 1874)
A lesbian is the rage of all women condensed to the point of explosion. “The Woman-Identified Woman” Radicalesbians (1970)
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Re: Not funny, not weird, not stupid -- but interesting.

Postby Proofrdr » 09 Dec 2015, 00:44

The first thing that came to my mind—and made me laugh out loud at myself—is that somewhere in Jane Ciabattari's (or her husband's) background, there was a baker who made such great ciabatta that he chose Ciabattari when Napoleon required last names of his newly conquered population.

It's a really interesting list. I expected to see Dickens, but not 2 of them in the top 15. Also, in the top 15 there is only 1 book from this century, and the others were written before 1928. I was also surprised that Tolkein did not make that top 15. A good portion of the list was on my college syllabi.

I think the most modern book I was assigned in college ('64 grad) was A Clock Work Orange. It scared me then; in some ways, I think we are living it now.
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Re: Not funny, not weird, not stupid -- but interesting.

Postby Sacchi » 09 Dec 2015, 15:13

I wonder how strictly they defined "British." Was James Joyce not there because he was Irish? But Jonathan Swift was Irish, too. Maybe it's more a matter of the political status of Ireland in Joyce's time. Or maybe the critics just don't like his work. (I had a hefty dose of Joyce in college ('65 grad.)
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Re: Not funny, not weird, not stupid -- but interesting.

Postby wildlx » 10 Dec 2015, 05:21

Proof, in the top 15 you missed that there's a book from 1949, Nineteen Eighty Four.
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Re: Not funny, not weird, not stupid -- but interesting.

Postby wildlx » 10 Dec 2015, 05:23

When Women Stopped Coding

Mark Zuckerberg. Bill Gates. Steve Jobs. Most of the big names in technology are men.

But a lot of computing pioneers, the ones who programmed the first digital computers, were women. And for decades, the number of women in computer science was growing.

But in 1984, something changed. The number of women in computer science flattened, and then plunged.
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