The Women of Google

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Re: The Women of Google

Postby Proofrdr » 30 Jan 2016, 00:46

Exactly.

Reminds me of that wonderful quote that Ginger Rogers did everything Fred Astaire did, only she did it backwards and in high heels.
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Re: The Women of Google

Postby wildlx » 03 Feb 2016, 10:09

FranW wrote:I learnt recently about Murial Bell. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muriel_Bell

There's Marilyn Waring
A lesbian is the rage of all women condensed to the point of explosion. “The Woman-Identified Woman” Radicalesbians (1970)
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Re: The Women of Google

Postby Proofrdr » 29 Apr 2016, 03:08

I can't seem to get a picture of her in here, but Google is honoring Hertha Marks Ayrton today on the anniversary of her birth. I'd not heard of her before, but she was a feisty woman of the late 1800s (28 April 1854 – 23 August 1923).

At a time when women were not granted degrees, she managed to get a Bachelor of Science degree from the University of London in 1889. She was a British engineer, mathematician, physicist, and inventor. Best known for her ground-breaking work on electric arcs and sand ripples, she was awarded the Hughes Medal by the Royal Society for that work.

Ayrton famously wrote: “An error that ascribes to a man what was actually the work of a woman has more lives than a cat.” :-)
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Re: The Women of Google

Postby ElaineB » 01 May 2016, 23:02

:cool: that quote! Though sad too.
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Re: The Women of Google

Postby Proofrdr » 02 May 2016, 02:54

And the bitch of it is that it's still happening in all professions.
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Re: The Women of Google

Postby Proofrdr » 19 May 2016, 23:52

Today, Google is honoring Yuri Kochiyama. It's an odd choice. On the one hand, Kochiyama was a fierce human rights advocate for minorities and she managed to get Congress to grant reparations to Japanese-Americans who were sent to Interment camps during WWII. On the other hand, she supported people who did some pretty violent acts and was pretty much an anarchist. She is quoted as saying "It's important we all understand that the main terrorist and the main enemy of the world's people is the U.S. government" and "the goal of the war on terrorism is more than just getting oil and fuel. The United States is intent on taking over the world."
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Re: The Women of Google

Postby ElaineB » 20 May 2016, 08:21

Yes, I thought that was interesting.
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Re: The Women of Google

Postby Proofrdr » 20 May 2016, 11:04

I remember her in the 60s and 70s. She was always connected to the outer fringe of protest groups. There was a fair amount of protesting going on then, but she always seemed to be walking on the wild side of it.
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Re: The Women of Google

Postby Proofrdr » 07 Jul 2016, 23:23

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Today, 155 years ago, was Nettie Stevens' birthday. She discovered XY sex chromosomes, but she didn't get credit because she had two X’s.

Stevens was awarded a bachelor's and master's degree at Stanford University by 1900, then went to Bryn Mawr for her PhD where she began research on solving the problem of sex determinism. She used the mealworm beetle and observed that the female mealworm’s cells had 20 large chromosomes. The male had 20 chromosomes as well, but the 20th was notably smaller than the other 19.

“This seems to be a clear case of sex determination,” Stevens wrote in Studies in Spermatogenesis, a report summarizing her findings.

She concluded (correctly) that this difference could be traced back to differences in the mealworm sperm. The sperm had either the small version of the 20th chromosome or the large one. “The spermatozoa which contain the small chromosome [determine] the male sex,” she wrote, “while those that contain 10 chromosomes of equal size determine the female sex.”

Stevens’s colleague and mentor E.B. Wilson is more commonly cited as the discoverer of sex chromosomes. In The History of Science Society. historian Stephen Brush explains:
It is generally stated that E. B. Wilson obtained the same results as Stevens, at the same time...but Wilson probably did not arrive at his conclusion on sex determination until after he had seen Stevens' results. ... Because of Wilson's more substantial contributions in other areas, he tends to be given most of the credit for this discovery.”

Wilson’s paper published before Stevens’s, and as the man with the higher reputation it’s he who has been credited with the discovery. But even though their papers were similar, it was Stevens who presented a stronger — and ultimately more correct — conclusion.

Wilson still believed environmental factors played a role in determining sex. Stevens said it was purely the chromosomes. Neither view could be confirmed absolutely at the time of the discovery.


Though time proved Stevens correct, it’s Wilson who got the credit. But now Google has set it right!
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Re: The Women of Google

Postby Proofrdr » 05 Dec 2016, 05:51

These aren't the women of Google, but they are women who are finally getting attention for their accomplishments. I first read about these "Women 'Computers' Who Revolutionized Astronomy" in The Atlantic. Now it's in their online archive and available to everyone. http://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2016/12/the-women-computers-who-measured-the-stars/509231/
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