Science in the News

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Re: Science in the News

Postby wildlx » 01 Nov 2014, 04:27

The top 100 papers

The discovery of high-temperature superconductors, the determination of DNA’s double-helix structure, the first observations that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating — all of these breakthroughs won Nobel prizes and international acclaim. Yet none of the papers that announced them comes anywhere close to ranking among the 100 most highly cited papers of all time.
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Re: Science in the News

Postby Baker » 04 Nov 2014, 06:20

That is interesting.

The exercise revealed some surprises, not least that it takes a staggering 12,119 citations to rank in the top 100 — and that many of the world’s most famous papers do not make the cut. A few that do, such as the first observation1 of carbon nanotubes (number 36) are indeed classic discoveries. But the vast majority describe experimental methods or software that have become essential in their fields.

The most cited work in history, for example, is a 1951 paper describing an assay to determine the amount of protein in a solution. It has now gathered more than 305,000 citations — a recognition that always puzzled its lead author, the late US biochemist Oliver Lowry.

Not surprising that a methods paper is the most cited.
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Re: Science in the News

Postby wildlx » 04 Nov 2014, 07:16

Yes, I knew about the Lowry paper being the most cited in biochemistry, just not overall. And the others in the top five of google scholar are also papers I commonly cite when I publish.
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Re: Science in the News

Postby wildlx » 04 Mar 2015, 00:57

The video here is fantastic: http://www.popsci.com/chinese-scientist ... -chemistry

For many, the phrase “chemical reactions” conjures memories of tedious laboratory work and equations scribbled on exams. But Yan Liang, a professor at the University of Science and Technology of China in Hefei, sees art in the basic science. Last September, Liang and colleagues launched beautiful​chemistry.net to highlight aesthetically pleasing chemistry. Their video showcases crystallization, fluorescence, and other reactions or structures shot in glorious detail. Liang says finding experiments that meet their visual standards has been a challenge. “Many reactions are very interesting, but not beautiful,” he says. “But sometimes, when shot at close distance without the distraction of beakers or test tubes, ordinary reactions such as precipitation can be very beautiful.”
"Beautiful Chemistry" won the Expert's Choice award for Video at the 2015 Vizzies.
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Re: Science in the News

Postby Baker » 04 Mar 2015, 06:22

Awesome. Thanks for that. The opening sequence in the silicate solution reminded me of childhood crystal garden growing. Did you do stuff like that, Wild?
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Re: Science in the News

Postby Sacchi » 04 Mar 2015, 11:20

Nice! When I was a kid I tried several times to make "rock candy" from theoretically super-saturated sugar water, but without success. I didn't want to eat it, just see the crystals grow.
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Re: Science in the News

Postby wildlx » 05 Mar 2015, 04:44

Baker wrote:Awesome. Thanks for that. The opening sequence in the silicate solution reminded me of childhood crystal garden growing. Did you do stuff like that, Wild?


:blush: No. I only began to be interested in chemistry while in high school.
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Re: Science in the News

Postby FranW » 05 Mar 2015, 06:16

I reckon I'll get interested in chemistry round about when I'm, oh, say, ninety or so.
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Re: Science in the News

Postby Baker » 05 Mar 2015, 06:53

When I was a kid, our Egg-donor used to take us regularly to flea markets (we were poor). The best thing ever was buying used chemistry sets, because they were dirt cheap (i.e. within my price range) and often barely used. One memorable set had a tube of sodium nitrate in it. And, yes, I did have some sulphur. Carbon, of course, was easy to come by in a house with an open fire. [These are the ingredients of gunpowder.] What's not to love about chemistry?

Yeah, Sacch, I wanted to watch crystals grow, too. Crystal gardens aren't good for that, since you tend to get more stalagmite structures rather than those indescribably beautiful sharp edges and planes of a well-formed crystal. Copper sulphate was awesome for that, and has the advantage of being blue.

One reaction I performed in my thesis work was spectacular. You could not only watch the crystals form in real-time, but you could also see the concentration currents forming and swirling through the liquid (ether). I remember making more than I needed of this stuff simply so I could hold the reaction vessel up against the window to watch it happen.
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Re: Science in the News

Postby Proofrdr » 05 Mar 2015, 07:58

I'm smiling, Baker. Your posts shows how much you love your specialty.
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