FranW reeds sum buks in 2010

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Re: FranW reeds sum buks in 2010

Postby FranW » 27 Mar 2010, 07:43

wildlx wrote:Ditto. You have to read the rest of the books, HH. Stay is fantastic. Which reminds me that I still haven't had time to read Always.
But I want my book back after Bakey reads it :;). Do as I did and buy the hardback second hand. I did the same for Stay and Always.
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Re: FranW reeds sum buks in 2010

Postby FranW » 27 Mar 2010, 07:44

#11. Chaps, by Jove Belle:
L. A romance with an unusual protagonist: Eden, a ghetto brat turned drug lord's "enforcer", who tries to run away from the drug lord in LA and leave behind her life of crime. She ends up on a dusty farm in Back Paddock, Idaho, where her first exposure to "normal" family life, barnyard animals, and a simple happy existence are enhanced by the farm owner, Brandi. The side characters, particularly Brandi's mother, the local computer-phobic mechanic, and the laconic uber-sensible sherrif, were well drawn and worked well. I had a hard time suspending disbelief over a few issues -- one being the protagonist's TSTL failure to fake her death in anything like a believable way and to assume a new identity, the second being the idea that a brand new Ducati would break down, the third being that the protagonist wouldn't just immediately whip out her phone and call Ducati (new Ducatis come with roadside assistance everywhere in the world, no questions asked). However, the ending tied things up more realistically than I was expecting, the protagonist's TSTL choices caught up with her, and the HEA was quite believable. 3+stars (If I were Tanner, I'd give an extra half-star for the horse :lol: )
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Re: FranW reeds sum buks in 2010

Postby FranW » 27 Mar 2010, 07:46

tanner wrote:I've just ordered Chaps, HH. Now you've gotten me really curious! :)


Nurse Jo wrote:Yes, I'm curious now too. May have to buy it too :) .
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Re: FranW reeds sum buks in 2010

Postby FranW » 27 Mar 2010, 07:46

Baker wrote:As an author, Gringa, do you find it useful or bloody irritating when readers point out things like this? Personally, I prefer it when my beta (that would be HH) or an editor points out stuff I need to double-check, but if it gets past us all, I do like readers to let me know. If nothing else, it shows that someone has been paying attention while reading. :)
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Re: FranW reeds sum buks in 2010

Postby FranW » 27 Mar 2010, 07:46

la_gringa89 wrote:That is a loaded question. Or maybe just the answer is loaded. It's also a little long winded and convoluted. Here goes:

I'm a big fan of the golden rule: Do unto others. Yada, yada, yada. As such, with post-publication feedback (like this), I am more interested in the intent than the feedback itself. Or rather, the intent goes a long way toward determining how I receive the feedback. For example, if I thought you were hopping up and down saying "neener, neener, you suck" (in a mean way, not in a goofy physical comedy kinda way), then I would be fixated on the fact that you were just being nasty and unable to hear the actual message, at least initially. Eventually, I'd be able to sit down and figure out what I really needed to learn from the feedback, but it would take me a while to get past being defensive.

Since I know that's not the case here, it doesn't bother me. Well, yes, it bothers me because it's a rather major mistake, and that's embarrassing. But I'm not caught up in a buch of defensive, negative emotions. I could spend a bunch of time justifying/defending it, but what's the point in that? Reality is, I missed a major bit of info during my too brief visit to ducati.com (most of which was spent going "ooh, pretty.").

I knew there were mistakes--HH didn't point out the one that bothers me the most--and that if anyone would catch them/discuss them, it would happen on this forum. I also knew, for the most part, it would be done respectfully and with good intentions.

And there it is.

The short answer? Yes. And no. Wait. What was the question?
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Re: FranW reeds sum buks in 2010

Postby FranW » 27 Mar 2010, 07:47

Baker wrote:Thanks for the honest answer. I agree. If someone is just gloating and calling me an idiot for getting something wrong, that is a smidge hard to take on the chin. On the other hand, if someone is pointing out that I made a boo-boo and that I really ought to have done my homework better, I can say: "minha culpa. You're right. I was sloppy. I won't do that again. At least, I'll try not to." (And I may secretly think to myself that my editor and copyeditor missed it, too.)
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Re: FranW reeds sum buks in 2010

Postby FranW » 27 Mar 2010, 07:47

la_gringa89 wrote:I knew there were mistakes--HH didn't point out the one that bothers me the most

Which just goes to show that while there will always be at least one reader who will find any given mistake, there will also always be at least one reader who will miss any given mistake. The trick is to minimise both the number of mistakes and the number of readers who will notice any given mistake.

(To my "ear", lesfic writers always get the horse stuff wrong, but I figure maybe my ear is outdated since I haven't spoken horse-lingo for decades.)
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Re: FranW reeds sum buks in 2010

Postby FranW » 27 Mar 2010, 07:48

#12. skins: contemporary Indigenous writing, edited by Kateri Akiwenzie-Damm and Josie Douglas:
AoC, CoC. An anthology of short stories by Native American, Inuit, First Nations, Aboriginal, and Maori authors. As with most collections, it's a mixed bag, but overall it was quite good. The pieces range from retellings of tribal myths to SF extrapolations of racism to contemporary life-as-the-other, and they're both thought-provoking and inspirational. I was particularly impressed with Kimberly Blaeser's Fancy Dog Contest, which was both humorous and poignant, Richard Frankland's Who Took The Children Away (with the superb line, "No, I think, they don't all hate us, they just can't see their own racism"), Bruce Pascoe's Tired Sailor, and Patricia Grace's It Used To Be Green Once. 4stars
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Re: FranW reeds sum buks in 2010

Postby FranW » 27 Mar 2010, 07:49

#13. Ash, by Malinda Lo: AoC, L. A YA fantasy novel that combines a retelling of the Cinderella tale with a lesbian coming-of-age. The story is both familiar and surprising, with the most unique point being the fairies -- beautiful and powerful, yet untrustworthy and evil -- who lead and mislead Aisling (Ash, the Cinderella character). The prose style is clean and simple, the story easy to read and yet fascinating, and this would have been a fine book had it not been for the ending which, for me, imparted a very distasteful and unacceptable message: that if someone truly loves you, you can take things from them, renege on your promises to them, leave them unhappy, and get away with it -- because they will do all these things for you out of love. 3+stars
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Re: FranW reeds sum buks in 2010

Postby FranW » 27 Mar 2010, 07:49

#14. Daughters of Jerusalem, by Charlotte Mendelson:
L. A contemporary literary novel about a fairly screwed up family, all of whom are very realistic and surprisingly likeable. The father, a scholar, is so obsessed with his professional rival that he's oblivious to everything else; the mother, twenty years her husband's junior, is, to her own utter astonishment and disbelief, embarking on a lesbian affair. Both daughters, craving their parent's attention, use opposite but increasingly dramatic strategies: one is wild and disobedient, the other self-injurious. The father's rival is the common thread, who brings each individual to destruction yet somehow manages to unite the family even as it disintegrates. Beautifully written (but not, contrary to the back cover claims, very funny, or indeed even a tiny bit funny -- British humour clearly escapes me) and quite gripping. 4+stars.
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