sbarret thinks she can read (50book challenge)

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sbarret thinks she can read (50book challenge)

Postby sbarret » 02 Apr 2010, 05:48

(ok attempting to copy over all my MANY MANY books)... heh

I can guarantee it won't be 50 books, but what the heck. This could be fun anyway!

Standard disclaimer that I haven't gotten any freebies from authors or publishers. My only freebies come from the town dump (where I rescue an occassional book) or gifts from nonAuthor nonPublisher relations.

erm, and not makin' a dime outa this. There, does that cover FTC fun?

and continuing the theft of HH's ratings system:
1star utter crap
2stars : not worth reading
3stars : okay but nothing out of the ordinary
3+stars : pretty good; you will probably enjoy it
4stars : really good; I recommend it
4+stars : very good indeed; I'll be reading this one again
5stars : the best I've read in a long time


Any my books from the last forum:


First book this year:
The Sea of Monsters by Rick Riordan- 2nd book in the Percy Jackson and the Olympians series.

3+stars

Percy Jackson is a half-blood - human mum, one of the Olympian Gods is his dad. If you remember your mythology (mostly I don't), that means Percy is a Hero. Nothing much goes right for Percy, but like all Heros, he has a quest-a-book that he gets dragged on. While he does come up against a Big Bad, he also deals with a lot of little bads, mostly from other Hero kids.

Fun, quick read that I thought was better than the first book in the series.

#2 - People of the Freshwater Lake: A Prehistory of Westborough, MA - by Curtiss Hoffman.

A readable, but dry book about the geology and archeological record of a mid-sized Massachusetts town. Covers the Native American presence in this area from about 8000 BC til colonial Contact period.

This gem would bore you to tears unless:
A - you dig archaeology
B - you live in or near Westborough MA. :roll:

I enjoyed it for what it was, a local history based on ground facts, not some colonial interpretation of what came before. 3stars


#3 - Lost Symbol by Dan Brown.

3stars okay but nothing out of the ordinary

A summary probly isn't needed for this one, but it's Dan Brown. So Langdon, his MC, is once again pulled into intrigue, in trouble w/ the authorities, haunted by the Big Bad Guy, and picks up a lady along the way. This time, it's set in Washington DC, and revolves around Masons. Unlike most Mason stories, this one is Pro Mason and anti-conspiracy theories.

If you followed the skimming thread, ya know I skimmed this one in the end. The interesting parts were the architecture, symbols, and bits of pseudo-history. The dull bits where the endless flashbacks for all the characters, and the now-predictable story arc.

I borrowed my mum's copy so I dunno if this is out in paperback yet or not. If not, definitely wait for paperback, unless you're a solid Dan Brown fan.


#4 - Spin Control, by Chris Morriarty.

3stars okay but nothing out of the ordinary

Given how much I enjoyed Spin State, I found this book a bit of a letdown. Maybe it's because The MC in Spin State is lesbian (ignoring the ending) but in Spin Control it's a gay man. I'd like to think I'm not that shallow tho... :oops:

Gist of the story - Arkady, a human construct (genetically engineered people, where an entire 'line' are created, all identical, all called Arkady) has to deal with regular humans (who despise constructs) in order to save his lover from a fate that is never clearly described. There is a lot of intrigue going on, here and there, politics, etc.

The interesting parts were the POV of the human constructs in general, and how their world view and experiences are so different from humans. There was also a ton about complexity theory..erm.. and ants. Unfortunately, much like the first book, the author whipped out a can of magic plot-fix-it at the end that was easily recognized early on if you read the 1st book (she used the same can o plot-fix-it there too, but at least it was a surprise the 1st time).


#5 - Dead Mourn, by Piers Anthony, etc

1star utter crap

I'm glad I got this one for free from the town dump, cuz that's right where it's going back. I don't think I've every read anything by this author before (and I never will again). it's an older SF, involving timetravel from a future dystopia to a past dystopia. Didn't really buy into either setting or the attitudes of the MC. And the ending just left me flat flat flat.


#6 -The Complete World of Human Evolution, by Chris Springer

5stars the best I've read in a long time

So probly not the top ten must-read for most folks round here, but if you really wanted to sink your teeth into the whole human origins debate (not the religious one) this is the book for you. It has all the deep archaeological and genetic details, but is highly readable with each topic covering only 2-4 pages (makes for a fast read!).

Thumbs up for anything by Chris Springer. He's the head of Human Origins in..er... some fancy British museum, but all of his writings so far have been very accessable and easy to read.

#7 Hellburner, by C.J. Cherryh.

3+stars pretty good; you will probably enjoy it


Another Union-Alliance universe novel. This one from the Earth Company point of view. It's a quick read, revolving around a small group of people brought together (some against their will) to fly a prototype attack ship, called the Hellburner. Cherryh does a great job of showing three separate Near Earth cultures based entirely on the actions/reactions/words of a handful of characters. There's the 'blue-skyers' - people who grew up on Earth, the Belters, who colonized the solar system, and the merchanters - people who live their entire lives on a merchant ship, traveling between starsystems. Merchant ships are family-run, so everyone on-board is your relative.


#8 The Platypus Ploy, by Clare McNabb

3stars okay but nothing out of the ordinary

This is the 3rd or 4th in McNabb's Kylie Kendall Mysteries. As expected, the mystery is light, but the prose is usually entertaining enough. I won't spoil ya for the Kylie/Arriana saga.

I enjoyed the earlier books, but I found myself doing a rapid-read on this one. The mystery didn't draw me in much, and the side characters just didn't seem as vibrant this time 'round.
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#9 - Fortress in the Eye of Time - CJ Cherryh

Postby sbarret » 20 Apr 2010, 07:53

#9 - Fortress in the Eye of Time- CJ Cherryh

4+stars : very good indeed; I'll be reading this one again

This is a fantasy story centered on a Medieval society, with lots of political infighting etc, and one young man who is an old wizard's Shaping. Tristen doesn't know who he is, why he is, or what he's supposed to do when he's forced to set out on his own.

Yeah, sounds trite and like a million other stories of its ilk, but Cherryh keeps you guessing for quite some time, and puts in regular twists and turns that make it worth reading. Though, gotta say, like many other of her books, it's a SLOOOOW start. You'll need to read the first 100 pages before you're really into the story.

No lesbian content at all btw, but one could easily fanfic the two main dudes into something, if that's your cuppa :welcome:
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Re: sbarret thinks she can read (50book challenge)

Postby Baker » 20 Apr 2010, 09:38

I've read some Cherryh books that I've really enjoyed and some that were a downright slog. She writes very dense prose, doesn't she? I think I prefer her sf to her fantasy, although I really liked the Chronicles of Morgaine. Is that book you read a standalone, Sandra?
Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities ~ Voltaire
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Re: sbarret thinks she can read (50book challenge)

Postby sbarret » 28 Apr 2010, 10:23

The one I read I THOUGHT was a standalone (and it ends well in that sense) but come to find out there are a couple more in that fantasy set.

I read Hammerfell and thought it sunk like lead. Dense, as you say. Most of her Alliance/Universe books are better in that regard.
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#10 Witchblade

Postby sbarret » 28 Apr 2010, 10:29

# 10 Witchblade, Vol 1 (1-8) - Graphic Novel

4stars - enjoyable read, think you'd like it
1star utter crap for the BINDING - fell apart and I'd already lost the receipt or I'd bring it back to the bookstore. Didn't last a WEEK!

This is the start of the Witchblade series of comic books, binding (and I use that term LOOSELY) the first 8 stories. The story stays interesting, and hey - who doesn't like gravity-defying breast-orbs in their superheroes, eh? :yikes:

The witchblade, if ya don't know, is a supernatural 'glove' that has been around for ages, helping folks like Joan of Arc etc do what she did. The newest owner is a NYPD cop w/ a minor attitude (and...aforementioned breast-orbs). She doesn't know what she's getting into really w/ the glove, and it doesn't play nice a lot of the time.

Anyway, enjoyed it enuf, despite the crap binding, that I'll probly get more. They have a big book of like the first 50 stories but I'm reluctant to get that one if the binding ends up crap on that too.
...word o the day... crap. :rant:
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#11 - Back Talk by Saxon Bennet

Postby sbarret » 28 Apr 2010, 10:33

#11 - Back Talk by Saxon Bennet

3stars - enjoyed it, even on the 2nd read.

This one is pure fluff, but entertaining, with a high emphasis on snark, and a low emphasis on angst. Yeah there's some, but mostly, it's just a fun read. Story is college grad lands job to run the website of famous talk-show host. One's gay, t'other's straight - you can guess the rest. Still, the writing style for the most part was enjoyable. And It was the 2nd time I read this one and still enjoyed it.
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Re: #10 Witchblade

Postby Lt Sue » 29 Apr 2010, 07:40

sbarret wrote:
The witchblade, if ya don't know, is a supernatural 'glove' that has been around for ages, helping folks


Is it an oven glove???
:whistle:
A Freudian slip is when you say one thing but mean your mother.
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Re: sbarret thinks she can read (50book challenge)

Postby ElaineB » 29 Apr 2010, 08:19

lol
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Re: sbarret thinks she can read (50book challenge)

Postby Athena » 30 Apr 2010, 02:41

Sue lol
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Re: #10 Witchblade

Postby sbarret » 04 May 2010, 04:09

Ssgt Sue wrote:
sbarret wrote:
The witchblade, if ya don't know, is a supernatural 'glove' that has been around for ages, helping folks


Is it an oven glove???
:whistle:


rofl rofl

Ok we need some creative artist here to do the oven-glove, lesbianized version of the Witchblade... who's up for it?!?
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