From print to e-press

Lesbian short story and novel publishers.

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Re: From print to e-press

Postby FranW » 24 Jun 2011, 07:08

I found this particularly telling:
Carina's books are priced from $2.99 to $5.99, lower than the typical Harlequin print book. James says the company found that at $6.99, the books no longer sell.
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Re: From print to e-press

Postby Proofrdr » 24 Jun 2011, 07:17

And they're edited, unlike much of the lower-priced Amazon fare.
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Re: From print to e-press

Postby FranW » 24 Jun 2011, 09:37

Another interesting article:

You'd think that the inventor of the printing press, which revolutionized all media after it, forever, would have reaped great riches from his invention, but that wasn't the case. It turned out that everything else that went into creating a book -- the paper, binding, transportation to book sellers, etc. -- was so expensive that you might as well copy them by hand.

Gutenberg had solved the wrong problem.

What kept the early publishing industry afloat was something quite unexpected, from a modern perspective: the printing of Papal indulgences. That's right: the birth of movable type was sheets of paper telling sinners they were absolved of their transgressions.

Eventually, of course, the printing press allowed for the explosion of an industry to a degree that none of its progenitors could have imagined. And maybe there were even a few visionaries back then who saw it coming. But in the meantime, those who made it work found the one thing that fit the economics of their nascent technology -- sort of like how so many outlets have come to rely on blogging to bring in the pageviews at a cost considerably below that of original reporting.

We all know that eventually, something like the print media most of us grew up with will find a way to sustain itself solely in a digital form. But what many have yet to realize is that the route to that eventuality could be strange and circuitous, indeed.
http://www.technologyreview.com/blog/mimssbits/26907/?p1=blogs
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Re: From print to e-press

Postby FranW » 27 Dec 2011, 09:06

This is interesting:

With print books, you have the hardback that comes out first (expensive) and then the mass market paperback or trade paperback that comes out later (cheaper), plus the library edition that is expensive but can take a lot of battering. Libraries, obviously, buy the library edition -- or several copies of the library edition, if it's a popular book. The physical book gets lent out, one reader at a time, until it's no longer popular (in which case it goes in the bin) or until it's falling apart (at which time the library buys another library-edition copy and lends it out to yet more readers). That's how publishers make money from libraries.

What happens with e-books? The publisher can state that the library can only lend an e copy to one reader at a time. Fair enough. But the e book never wears out. The spine never cracks, the pages never get torn, the cover never fades. The library will never need to buy replacement e books. And publishers aren't liking that. At least, not the big publishers who publish the big, popular books that get worn out by library patrons and need to be re purchased by the libraries from the publishers.

Publishers know, too, that many people will prefer to buy a book and own that tangible, lend-to-a-friend physical copy. Many people also prefer to just buy a book and then read it at their leisure, spilling coffee willy-nilly on the pages, instead of slogging to the library, borrowing the book, taking it home, making sure the kids don't get sticky fingerprints on it, hurriedly reading it before it's due, and then taking it back to the library. You don't have that problem with electronically borrowing electronic books, though.

And that is a source of great worry for publishers. In their eyes, borrowing an e-book from a library has been too easy. Worried that people will click to borrow an e-book from a library rather than click to buy it, almost all major publishers in the United States now block libraries’ access to the e-book form of either all of their titles or their most recently published ones.

However, that's not necessarily bad news. Note what it says: almost all major publishers.

HarperCollins is the one major publisher that has taken the step of changing the traditional arrangements with libraries. Beginning last March, it stopped selling e-books to libraries for unlimited use, which it had been doing since 2001. Instead, it began licensing use of each e-book copy for a maximum of 26 loans. This affects only the most popular titles and has no practical effect on others. After the limit is reached, the library can repurchase access rights at a lower cost than the original price.

While many major publishers have effectively gone on strike, more than 1,000 smaller publishers, who don’t have best-seller sales that need protection, happily sell e-books to libraries. That means the public library has plenty of e-books available for the asking — no waiting. Making those lesser-known books available to patrons renews libraries’ primary function: offering readers a place for discovery.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/25/busin ... 2&emc=eta1
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Re: From print to e-press

Postby Baker » 28 Dec 2011, 07:06

That is interesting. I hadn't considered the finite lifetime of library books. And, yes, when you can borrow ebooks from the library as easily as you can buy one online, it's not hard to see how lending becomes more popular with the concomitant decline in sales.

Cool to see this might be a boon for smaller publishers. :-)
Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities ~ Voltaire
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