Bedazzled Ink interview: January 2008

Information about publishers of GLBT fiction.

Moderator: FranW

Bedazzled Ink interview: January 2008

Postby FranW » 28 Mar 2010, 08:50

Meet BEDAZZLED INK, a small press I'm delighted to have the opportunity to spotlight, and whose Senior Editor, Carrie Tierney, has been kind enough to agree to join us on the forum for a spot of Q & A.

Bedazzled Ink is comprised of several imprints:
Khimairal Ink, a free-to-read online/PDF magazine of lesbian genre short stories.
Dragonfeather Books, children's books to fire the imagination.
Mindancer Press, fantasy and science fiction novels.
Nuance Books, the best in both genre and mainstream lesbian fiction.

Their covers and interior art, like their fiction, run the gamut from humorous to dramatic.
Image Image
Khimairal Ink has long been listed on our forum's Markets: Magazines thread as a paying market for lesbian short stories, and KI also had the good taste to publish Mallory's Gift by L-J Baker, our lovely admin hostess.

:welcome: Carrie, and I'm sure our forum members will have lots of questions for you. I daresay I'll have one or two as well :lol:
No on H8
User avatar
FranW
Heartbeat of the forum
Heartbeat of the forum
 
Posts: 7084
Joined: 20 Mar 2010, 10:00

Re: Bedazled Ink interview: January 2008

Postby FranW » 28 Mar 2010, 08:50

Baker wrote:I have a couple of questions, if I may kick the ball off.

I have indeed had a positive experience with Khimairal Ink--not just because they accepted my story. I found dealing with KI friendly and professional.

My questions:

1) I'm surprised that a small press has so many arms, especially since both Nuance and Dragonfeather only have 4 books listed each as I write this. Would a small press not be better concentrating on a single niche? Or have you found this division works better?

2) As an author, the first thing I check on a publisher's website is how many books they publish and who they publish. The second thing is how they sell those books. Does Bedazzled Ink operate on the POD model?

3) What do you see as the long-term aims for Bedazzled Ink's imprints? If an author were considering submitting to BI, what could she look forward to from that relationship in the long-run in terms of marketing, sales, editing, etc?

I hope that's not too many questions.
No on H8
User avatar
FranW
Heartbeat of the forum
Heartbeat of the forum
 
Posts: 7084
Joined: 20 Mar 2010, 10:00

Re: Bedazzled Ink interview: January 2008

Postby FranW » 28 Mar 2010, 08:51

HH wrote:Since I'm a short story writer, I'd like to pick Carrie's brains a bit about Khimairal Ink.

-- Who is KI's readership -- are you able to track it, is it primarily lesbians, and how many readers (approx) read each issue?
-- What proportion of submissions do you accept for publication?
-- Why doesn't KI publish poetry as well as short fiction? (I'm not a poet by any means, just curious about that one.)
-- Do you as editor have a genre preference for KI?
-- Does KI/Bedazzled Ink have any intentions of publishing themed short story anthologies in future?
-- How do you keep a magazine running when you pay your authors and don't charge your readers? :dunno:
No on H8
User avatar
FranW
Heartbeat of the forum
Heartbeat of the forum
 
Posts: 7084
Joined: 20 Mar 2010, 10:00

Re: Bedazzled Ink interview: January 2008

Postby FranW » 28 Mar 2010, 08:51

carrietierney wrote:Hi everyone,

I'm at your disposal. Be gentle.

I look forward to chatting with you guys.

Carrie
No on H8
User avatar
FranW
Heartbeat of the forum
Heartbeat of the forum
 
Posts: 7084
Joined: 20 Mar 2010, 10:00

Re: Bedazzled Ink interview: January 2008

Postby FranW » 28 Mar 2010, 08:51

Jess wrote:Carrie it's a pleasure to have you aboard. Thank you for taking some time out of your schedule to answer some questions. I'm looking forward to hearing your thoughts and answers. :)

Jess
No on H8
User avatar
FranW
Heartbeat of the forum
Heartbeat of the forum
 
Posts: 7084
Joined: 20 Mar 2010, 10:00

Re: Bedazzled Ink interview: January 2008

Postby FranW » 28 Mar 2010, 08:52

carrietierney wrote:
I have indeed had a positive experience with Khimairal Ink--not just because they accepted my story. I found dealing with KI friendly and professional.


We were very pleased to get your submission. You're an excellent writer. We'd love to see more stories by you.(';)')


My questions:

1) I'm surprised that a small press has so many arms, especially since both Nuance and Dragonfeather only have 4 books listed each as I write this. Would a small press not be better concentrating on a single niche? Or have you found this division works better?


After we decided to form a publishing company, we talked for well over a year about what we wanted to publish and how we wanted to approach publishing.

The one thing we want to do is to remain a small publisher. We're not interested in publishing a bunch of books just to fill up imprints. We're interested in publishing just a few books a year.

We also want to publish books that interest us and it just so happens they don't all fit a single neat category.

Which brings us to a sidebar of sorts: The whole idea of having to categorize books has come from big-chained bookstores that don't have time for content ambiguity and won't buy books that don't fit a category or fits more than one category because it's too much trouble figuring out where to shelve them. Readers and writers have also gotten used to having categories.

Our first published book was a children's book. Our second published book was a lesbian romance. It seemed the smart idea at the time to have a different imprint for each, so not to confuse the readership. We created the speculative fiction imprint because that's our favorite genre. That's what we read for pleasure.

The divisions do work for us. Our approach is organic. We create imprints for books, we don't create an imprint and hope we find books to fill it. The imprint is just a way to let readers know the genre of a specific book.

2) As an author, the first thing I check on a publisher's website is how many books they publish and who they publish. The second thing is how they sell those books. Does Bedazzled Ink operate on the POD model?


During our year long discussion, we studied all the publishing models out there. One of us comes from a strong academic library background and had also worked for a major International book distributor.

I don't know what you mean by "POD model." POD gets a bad rap because vanity presses jumped on the POD bandwagon first. POD is not a model, it's a printing technology, just like offset press, and the manual printing press. It's just the latest technology and our chain bookstores are full of books printed POD, instead of offset nowadays.

Our model is actually traditional small publisher. We have that one advantage over the traditional small publisher in that we're taking full advantage of the technological advances in printing. We use a POD printer.

Our reason for selecting a POD printer wasn't for the printer. It was for what this particular printer also provided as a part of the package. First off, this printer is used by all the major and minor publishing houses, so the quality is aimed at the highest common denominator because they want Random House's, etc. business. They are also owned by Ingram, the largest US wholesaler. They also have an agreement with Bertram's, the largest UK wholesaler. And they print books in both the US and UK depending on where the order comes from. We also have the option to make print runs, for fulfillment for things like our listings in Genre Mall, for instance.

All for the cost of setup for printing. Starting a publishing company is a long learning curve and the more a publisher doesn't have to deal with--like how to get the book where readers can see it--the better. We can concentrate on producing books and steering readers to where they can buy them.

3) What do you see as the long-term aims for Bedazzled Ink's imprints? If an author were considering submitting to BI, what could she look forward to from that relationship in the long-run in terms of marketing, sales, editing, etc?


We plan to be in business for a long time, if that's what you're asking. As long as we a have a book under contract we continue to get the word out about it, continue to market it--we're too small to have backlists.
No on H8
User avatar
FranW
Heartbeat of the forum
Heartbeat of the forum
 
Posts: 7084
Joined: 20 Mar 2010, 10:00

Re: Bedazzled Ink interview: January 2008

Postby FranW » 28 Mar 2010, 08:52

carrietierney wrote:
HH wrote:Since I'm a short story writer, I'd like to pick Carrie's brains a bit about Khimairal Ink.


Uh, ouch. My poor brain.

-- Who is KI's readership -- are you able to track it, is it primarily lesbians, and how many readers (approx) read each issue?


Ya know, we can track how people get to the site -- from our announcements, from other Web sites, from keyword searches. We don't know anything about these readers, though, unless they tell us. We know that a certain percentage of our authors aren't lesbian or even female for that matter.

The boss looks at stats, so she's running down the numbers for me. I can tell you the hits. We get 85,000-100,000 hits during the month an issue comes out and 25,000 to 35,000 hits on off months.

-- What proportion of submissions do you accept for publication?


About 50%.

-- Why doesn't KI publish poetry as well as short fiction? (I'm not a poet by any means, just curious about that one.)


We did publish poetry once. Heck, we published a short play. The answer is, we like short stories and want to showcase them.

-- Do you as editor have a genre preference for KI?


I don't think I've been shy in stating in the KI blog or in KI itself that my favorite genre is speculative fiction. Our current issue is our favorite issue because by pure coincidence all our good subs were spec fic.

-- Does KI/Bedazzled Ink have any intentions of publishing themed short story anthologies in future?


We have a call for submissions for an anthology right now --
http://nuancebooks.wordpress.com/books/ ... and-proud/
-- How do you keep a magazine running when you pay your authors and don't charge your readers? :dunno:


Khimairal Ink is a labor of love. We're hoping to sell more ads than we do. People are good at promising to buy ads but never follow through. Some of our authors tell us to keep the payment or have us promise them a cup of coffee if we ever meet.
No on H8
User avatar
FranW
Heartbeat of the forum
Heartbeat of the forum
 
Posts: 7084
Joined: 20 Mar 2010, 10:00

Re: Bedazzled Ink interview: January 2008

Postby FranW » 28 Mar 2010, 08:53

carrietierney wrote:
Thanks for your answers, Carrie.


You're welcome. I hope they made sense.

And in case any nosy person is wondering...
Carrie wrote:Some of our authors tell us to keep the payment or have us promise them a cup of coffee if we ever meet.

I waived payment in favour of an add in the next issue. ;)


Oh yeah, that's the other thing authors do instead of taking payment.

Authors can put a free ad in the issue their story appears in. It's the least we can do because we can't pay what the stories are really worth.
No on H8
User avatar
FranW
Heartbeat of the forum
Heartbeat of the forum
 
Posts: 7084
Joined: 20 Mar 2010, 10:00

Re: Bedazzled Ink interview: January 2008

Postby FranW » 28 Mar 2010, 08:53

Jess wrote:I'm new to this whole process, so my question might sound a bit naive but once you publish a story how long do you keep the rights to it? And at what point could it be re-submitted to another publisher?
No on H8
User avatar
FranW
Heartbeat of the forum
Heartbeat of the forum
 
Posts: 7084
Joined: 20 Mar 2010, 10:00

Re: Bedazzled Ink interview: January 2008

Postby FranW » 28 Mar 2010, 08:53

carrietierney wrote:If you're talking about a short story for Khimairal Ink. We ask for electronic rights for four months, which is how long an issue is current. After that the electronic rights revert back to you. We do keep stories in our back issue archives unless an author asks for a story to be removed.

Now note, we only ask for electronic rights. You could sell the story to a strictly print publication while we hold the electronic rights.

If you're talking about a novel, I can only speak for Bedazzled Ink, since publishers vary in what rights they ask for and for how long.

Your question touches upon why you should never give a publisher rights that they're not going to use. For instance, if they're only going to publish a paperback book, don't let them take audio rights or even hard cover rights.

We ask for only English language trade paperback rights. We also put out hard cover editions for our children's books, so we ask for hard cover rights for them. The length of time we have these rights is the duration of the contract. The standard duration of a contract is 3 years, but that's negotiable.
No on H8
User avatar
FranW
Heartbeat of the forum
Heartbeat of the forum
 
Posts: 7084
Joined: 20 Mar 2010, 10:00

Next

Return to Meet the Publishers

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron