Selkie Attempt # ...3? 4?

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Re: Selkie Attempt # ...3? 4?

Postby wildlx » 13 Jul 2013, 21:46

I expect it is only commonly used in Latin languages:

Latin - quotidianus
Portuguese - quotidiano
Italian - quotidiano
French - quotidien
Spanish - cotidiano
Romanian - cotidian
Catalan - quotidià

So, Baker, if it is so rare in English how come you knew the word?
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Re: Selkie Attempt # ...3? 4?

Postby Baker » 14 Jul 2013, 10:10

Now, I don't know about you olive-skinned people, but as Jo alluded to, we English speakers have these useful objects called "dictionaries". Thanks to Dr Johnson, we stick all the words in our language in such a collection and promptly forget what 97.5% of the words mean--and even that they exist. But they're there, in their little papery word zoos, should we need to examine an exotic specimen. But we take extra care not to let too many of them out to roam wild in the world. Occaisionally, those who would like to seem erudite let one loose, whereupon the English speakers politely ignore it completely if it wanders amongst them. There have been rumours of exceedingly strange individuals who, as mal-adjusted children, actually read these dictionaries. But that seems a little far-fetched.
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Re: Selkie Attempt # ...3? 4?

Postby wildlx » 14 Jul 2013, 11:56

Baker wrote:N There have been rumours of exceedingly strange individuals who, as mal-adjusted children, actually read these dictionaries. But that seems a little far-fetched.

Ah, another one that suffered from that illness (of course, not English language dictionaries in my case)... Nurse Jo also suffered from that illness, I believe.
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Re: Selkie Attempt # ...3? 4?

Postby Baker » 15 Jul 2013, 07:32

;) On a tangent--while we're highjacking Selk's thread--one of the big advantages of paper books over ebooks, IMHO, is the ability to browse. When I'm flicking through a dictionary looking for a word, it's not unusual for my eye to catch on a cool or strange word, and I'll stop to investigate. When you use a search function or a link that takes you directly where you want to go, you lose the browsing.
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Re: Selkie Attempt # ...3? 4?

Postby wildlx » 16 Jul 2013, 03:32

Not completely, in my case. I find myself frequentlty following links within the online dictionaries.
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Re: Selkie Attempt # ...3? 4?

Postby Selkie » 29 Jul 2013, 15:37

#20. Stealing Second: Sam's Story (Clarksonville Series #4) by Barbara L. Clanton 3stars

Samantha Rose Payton likes girls, but her parents don’t know that. And Sam would like to keep it that way, because her parents are ultra-conservative Republicans. They live in a mansion and have servants and chauffeurs, but instead of playing the part of a dutiful debutante who plays the violin and still has a nanny at age seventeen, Sam would rather watch ice-hockey on TV and play second base on her summer softball team.

Having to hide her relationship with her girlfriend Lisa from her parents is becoming an agonizing struggle. Not only are her friends pressuring her to come out to her parents, they are also trying to convince her to attend a very public gay pride festival at the local college. At least she has her nanny Helene to confide in, but for how much longer? Sam is acutely aware that the time for Helene to move on may be fast approaching.

And if that wasn’t enough, Sam’s summer softball coach gives her no end of grief after an error-filled game and isn’t afraid of making an example out of her. Will Sam remain the perfect princess her parents expect? Will her beloved nanny leave her forever? Will her girlfriend get fed up about being kept hidden? Will her friends continue to pressure her about coming out? Will Coach Greer make her life miserable?


An enjoyable read, but definitely not the best entry in the series. Some of the plot points felt contrived, and I felt that several of them didn't get the development they needed.
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Re: Selkie Attempt # ...3? 4?

Postby Selkie » 29 Jul 2013, 15:41

#21. The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot 4stars

Her name was Henrietta Lacks, but scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor Southern tobacco farmer who worked the same land as her slave ancestors, yet her cells—taken without her knowledge—became one of the most important tools in medicine. The first “immortal” human cells grown in culture, they are still alive today, though she has been dead for more than sixty years. If you could pile all HeLa cells ever grown onto a scale, they’d weigh more than 50 million metric tons—as much as a hundred Empire State Buildings. HeLa cells were vital for developing the polio vaccine; uncovered secrets of cancer, viruses, and the atom bomb’s effects; helped lead to important advances like in vitro fertilization, cloning, and gene mapping; and have been bought and sold by the billions.

Yet Henrietta Lacks remains virtually unknown, buried in an unmarked grave.

Now Rebecca Skloot takes us on an extraordinary journey, from the “colored” ward of Johns Hopkins Hospital in the 1950s to stark white laboratories with freezers full of HeLa cells; from Henrietta’s small, dying hometown of Clover, Virginia—a land of wooden slave quarters, faith healings, and voodoo—to East Baltimore today, where her children and grandchildren live and struggle with the legacy of her cells.

Henrietta’s family did not learn of her “immortality” until more than twenty years after her death, when scientists investigating HeLa began using her husband and children in research without informed consent. And though the cells had launched a multimillion-dollar industry that sells human biological materials, her family never saw any of the profits. As Rebecca Skloot so brilliantly shows, the story of the Lacks family—past and present—is inextricably connected to the dark history of experimentation on African Americans, the birth of bioethics, and the legal battles over whether we control the stuff we are made of.

Over the decade it took to uncover this story, Rebecca became enmeshed in the lives of the Lacks family—especially Henrietta’s daughter Deborah, who was devastated to learn about her mother’s cells. She was consumed with questions: Had scientists cloned her mother? Did it hurt her when researchers infected her cells with viruses and shot them into space? What happened to her sister, Elsie, who died in a mental institution at the age of fifteen? And if her mother was so important to medicine, why couldn’t her children afford health insurance?


What Baker said. :sweat:

I actually borrowed this book from my library, and... promptly forgot about it. Until Saturday. Which happened to be two days before it's due/return date.

I did finish it, but I wish I had taken more time to read it. That was a lot of information to take in over the span of two days. Regardless, I found it to be very informative and interesting!
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Re: Selkie Attempt # ...3? 4?

Postby Selkie » 29 Aug 2013, 14:57

#22. Game of Thrones (A Song of Ice and Fire #1) by George R. R. Martin 3stars

Summers span decades. Winter can last a lifetime. And the struggle for the Iron Throne has begun.

As Warden of the north, Lord Eddard Stark counts it a curse when King Robert bestows on him the office of the Hand. His honour weighs him down at court where a true man does what he will, not what he must … and a dead enemy is a thing of beauty.

The old gods have no power in the south, Stark’s family is split and there is treachery at court. Worse, the vengeance-mad heir of the deposed Dragon King has grown to maturity in exile in the Free Cities. He claims the Iron Throne.


The cast of characters in this book is huge. There is a character appendix in the back, and I made good use of it (I was still referring to it quite often, even 500 pages in).

The book is narrated in turns by a number of characters, and each chapter is headed by a name - so you know exactly whose point of view you are going to get. It works well, but at the same time made it harder for me to get through the book. I'd see the character name and think, "Ugh, him again?" I often found myself flipping through the chapters to see when my preferred characters were going to narrate again.

Although I didn't find myself becoming attached to any of the characters, I did enjoy the plot and world-building. Although the sexism and misogyny can be staggering, at times - it's pretty pervasive within the book - I found the medieval setting made it easier to stomach. Not because it's okay, but because it's accurate as a reflection of medieval times in real life.

I'm not in love with the book, as so many people seem to be, but I enjoyed it enough to pick up the second entry in the series.
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Re: Selkie Attempt # ...3? 4?

Postby Selkie » 29 Aug 2013, 15:04

#23. A Clash of Kings (A Song of Ice and Fire #2) by George R. R. Martin 3+stars

Time is out of joint. The summer of peace and plenty, ten years long, is drawing to a close, and the harsh, chill winter approaches like an angry beast. Now, from the ancient citadel of Dragonstone to the forbidding shores of Winterfell, chaos reigns, as pretenders to the Iron Throne of the Seven Kingdoms prepare to stake their claims through tempest, turmoil, and war.

A Clash of Kings transports us into a magnificent, forgotten land of revelry and revenge, wizardry and wartime. It is a tale in which maidens cavort with madmen, brother plots against brother, and the dead rise to walk in the night. Here a princess masquerades as an orphan boy; a knight of the mind prepares a poison for a treacherous sorceress; and wild men descend from the Mountains of the Moon to ravage the countryside.

Against a backdrop of incest and fratricide, alchemy and murder, the price of glory may be measured in blood. And the spoils of victory may just go to the men and women possessed of the coldest steel...and the coldest hearts. For when rulers clash, all of the land feels the tremors.


I enjoyed this more than the previous book. The characters I find most interesting played a larger role, and though I'm still not overly attached to anyone, I did find myself becoming teary at points.

There are occasions where I feel too much information is being dumped on the reader at once, and I would sometimes skim through them. Of course, sometimes that info I skimmed over ended up being important, and I had to go back and re-read the section... and finding a single scene in a 1000-page book is really difficult! :sweat: I feel like there should be a better way to present all this information, but I don't have any concrete ideas as to how.

I will be picking up the next book in the series (hoping to find it at a used bookstore somewhere in Tokyo).
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Re: Selkie Attempt # ...3? 4?

Postby Baker » 30 Aug 2013, 08:45

Selkie wrote:and finding a single scene in a 1000-page book is really difficult!

:uh: Wow.

I've wondered what the books are like, since the tv series has attracted such an intense following.
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